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How to write the Hebrew Alphabet

How to Write the Hebrew Alphabet

Writing the Hebrew alphabet can be a bit tricky for beginners since it's a non-Latin script, but with practice, you can certainly master it. Hebrew is written from right to left, and it has 22 letters, all of which are consonants. Some letters have a final form when they appear at the end of a word. Here's a guide on how to write each letter:

  1. Alef (א): Make a diagonal stroke down and to the right, followed by a shorter stroke extending from the upper-middle of the first stroke. Then, make a smaller stroke pointing upwards from the bottom-middle of the first stroke.

  2. Bet (ב): Make a vertical line from top to bottom, then make two horizontal lines from that line to the right, forming a shape like the number "7". The top horizontal line is shorter than the bottom one.

  3. Gimel (ג): Start with a long stroke down and to the right. Then, near the top of that stroke, draw a shorter horizontal line to the right. From the top of the long stroke, draw another line upwards and to the left.

  4. Dalet (ד): Draw a large rectangle, open at the bottom.

  5. He (ה): Similar to Dalet, but the vertical line on the right should extend below the horizontal line.

  6. Vav (ו): A straight vertical line.

  7. Zayin (ז): A vertical line with a small horizontal line extending to the right from the top.

  8. Chet (ח): Start with a vertical line, then draw a horizontal line extending to the right from the top. From the rightmost point of the horizontal line, draw another vertical line going down.

  9. Tet (ט): Draw a circle, then from the top-middle, draw a line upwards.

  10. Yod (י): A small stroke, slightly curved downwards.

  11. Kaf (כ, ך-final): Draw a vertical line. From the top, draw a large curve extending to the right and down, with a smaller curve at the bottom extending upwards and to the left. The final form is a long vertical line with a slight curve at the top to the left.

  12. Lamed (ל): Draw a short horizontal line from left to right, then from the rightmost point of the line, draw a line upwards and slightly to the left. From the top point of the upward stroke, draw a large curve to the left and down.

  13. Mem (מ, ם-final): Start with a vertical line, then draw a large curve extending to the right and back down to the same height as the start. The final form is a square.

  14. Nun (נ, ן-final): Draw a vertical line, then from the top, draw a line to the right. The final form is a long vertical line with a slight curve at the top to the left.

  15. Samekh (ס): A simple circle.

  16. Ayin (ע): Start with a vertical line, then draw a large curve extending to the right and back down to the same height as the start.

  17. Pe (פ, ף-final): Similar to Ayin, but has a vertical line that extends below the start of the curve. The final form is similar to the final form of Nun, but with a longer curve extending from the top to the left.

  18. Tsade (צ, ץ-final): Draw a Yod, then extend the bottom downwards. The final form is a long vertical line with a short horizontal line extending to the left from the top, and a long curve extending to the left from the middle.

  19. Qof (ק): Draw a circle, then from the bottom-middle, draw a line downwards.

  20. Resh (ר): Draw a vertical line, then from the top, draw a large curve extending to the right and down.

  21. Shin (ש): Draw three vertical lines side by side, then draw a horizontal line from the top of the left line to the top of the right line.

  22. Tav (ת): Similar to Nun, but the horizontal line at the top extends further to the right.

It's worth mentioning that Hebrew also uses a system of "niqqud", diacritical signs, to represent vowels, but these are often only used in religious texts, poetry, children's books, and in language learning resources. It would be very helpful to visualize these letters as you practice. Consider using an online resource or guidebook to provide visual aids as you learn the alphabet. Also, keep in mind that letters may look a bit different in different fonts or handwriting styles. As you become more familiar with the script, you'll be able to recognize these variations.


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